My first Sew Me Sunshine fabric review.

When Harriet asked me if I’d contribute a blog post for Sew Me Sunshine I was excited and very happy to help. After I’d had a good look at all their lovely fabrics I settled on the pink colour-way of the Gemma viscose/linen mix, it’s such a pretty shade with a magnolia flower print. When the fabric arrived Harriet has included a helpful card with full fabric details including fibre composition details plus width and quantity purchased. There’s a space to note if you pre-wash or not before it goes in the stash or straight to use.

The print is quite wide spaced and one-way [actually there are one set of flowers which run in one direction and another set which go the opposite way] so it’s worth bearing this in mind with pattern placement, and all your pieces should be positioned one way or the other.

I decided to make a Maven patterns French Dart shift dress which I’ve made twice before because it’s a lovely simple shape with no fastenings which makes it quite quick to make, three sleeve options, side seam pockets and an elegant roll collar.  

Because of the positioning of the print I opted to have the smaller flowers running down the centre rather than the large blooms which would have resulted in a more wasteful lay plan. As I had enough fabric I opted for the long sleeved version which I’ve made both times previously, the gathers at the cuff are so pretty. I cut the sleeves so that similar flowers are on a level with the dress front.

Because the fabric is quite loosely-woven and a linen mix it tends to fray a bit you’ll need to be aware of this. Making a style with lots of gathers may not be wise because it will start to come apart eventually the more you pull the gathers up-the cuffs on this dress were fine as it’s fairly short. The fabric would look lovely in pleats or folds too.

the gathered cuff has a pretty binding

The fabric sews up beautifully, it isn’t overly drapey but it’s nicely fluid and responds well to pressing although like most linen, and linen/mix, there is noticeable but not excessive creasing-this is one of the features of the fabric and you have to accept that as part of it, it isn’t a fault. You could also use it for loose-fitting shirts or trousers, for example the Zadie jumpsuit from Paper Theory would look gorgeous in it or what about the Tilly and the Buttons Seren dress, nothing too tight-fitting though as it will crease badly or ‘seat’. You can always add a soft cotton lawn lining to a fabric like this which might help, this particular fabric isn’t sheer though so you can’t really see through it.

The structure of the fabric lends itself to the roll-neck collar and this one doesn’t have any interfacing in it, it stands well on its own.

I’m really happy with the finished dress, it’s very feminine and in a very unpredictable British climate I think it will be ideal on cooler warm days (does that make sense!?) I’ll wear it with tights in the autumn. Incidentally, I hand finished the hem so that the stitches are invisible, you could machine it up though.

We went to a wedding at Hatfield House just after I finished the dress so what better opportunity to wear it and stand in front of some of the most beautiful wisteria. What you can’t see is the long-sleeved thermal top I’m wearing underneath because it was actually freeeezing cold and I was determined not to wear a coat over the top!
We’re always entertaining wedding guests!
In the beautiful Old Palace Garden, it’s evening now so it was getting a bit dark for decent photos really.

Thank you Harriet for providing me with the fabric and the opportunity to write about it-it also comes in a pale blue colour-way too which is equally lovely if pink isn’t your thing. 

Until next time,

Happy Sewing,

Sue


a new self drafted top.

I first made the original of this top two years ago copying a Jigsaw top which I wrote about here (the words are still there if you want to read it but something has corrupted the photos unfortunately) but this is what it looked like, the grey one is the original.IMG_3332

When I made the first version I started by making a plan of all the measurements and dimensions of the original top. IMG_3331

I wanted to experiment with a couple of changes to this pattern so I used some plain jersey from the stash which wasn’t earmarked for a specific project. It wasn’t as fluid as the striped version so I decided to make it a slightly more structured shape with a curved and faced hem, I brought the neckline in a bit and changed the collar, and finally made the cuffs more ruched.

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I used a woven cotton poplin for stability rather than jersey for the facing which was shaped to be quite deep-about 6cms-and which follows the curve at the hem.

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I under stitched the edge of the facing to help it roll inwards properly and then I stitched it again near the top edge which was going to be visible on the outside.

In order to make the cuffs ruch and stay like that, rather than collapse into random folds, I stitched a piece of narrow elastic onto the seam allowance using a 3-step zigzag stitch and which I stretched as I sewed. Once I’d done that I turned the hem up with a twin-needle.

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inside the sleeve

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By stretching the elastic as I sewed it on the cuffs wrinkle up like this.

I wanted a different collar to the stripes so I brought the neckline in much closer and cut a deep straight band to fit it exactly. This is sewn on folded over and can be worn standing straight up or folded down as a roll collar, a bit like a fisherman’s smock.fullsizeoutput_21f7fullsizeoutput_21f6fullsizeoutput_21f5

I think this version has turned out a bit more tunic-like than I’d intended but that’s fine, it’s still wearable. IMG_4810fullsizeoutput_21e7fullsizeoutput_21e4fullsizeoutput_21ed

I might make it again in something softer and drapier, and possibly not even jersey because there are details like the faced hem and gathered cuff that I like, although I might use them on a different garment altogether. I’m not wld about the colour in the end even though I chose it myself!! This one is more like a slightly upscale sweatshirt I think with it’s slouchy shape.

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What do you think? Have you ever tried copying a favourite pattern?

Happy Sewing

Sue

 

Zierstoff patterns Amy top

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I’ve used a few Zierstoff patterns now including the Gina skirt which I blogged about here, a reversible Sophie bolero and the Sue T-shirt (I think this one is due a revisit soon actually)

The latest ones on my cutting table have been the Juliene top and the Amy top and I love them both!

The Juliene is a very loose fitting casual top with a scoop neckline and asymmetric hem which I made in a very inexpensive loose knit with a hint of glitter which I bought in Fabricland, Salisbury at the end of last summer. [As I’ve mentioned in my previous posts Zierstoff are a PDF pattern company based in Germany and you simply choose your pattern, pay for it, download and print] Juliene uses just 3 pattern pieces [front/back, long sleeve or short sleeve plus a neck band] It’s the sort of top you can whizz up in no time.

My Juliene looks a bit shabby at the edges now as I’ve worn it so much but I think that’s the sign of a successful make.

The Amy is a similar silhouette in that it’s very loose fitting with a dropped ‘armhole’ seam but it has extra long sleeves which pool in folds around your wrists, there’s a horizontal seam across the back, a high/low hemline and casual roll neck collar. The sizing is suitable for teens age 13 up to UK ladies size 18 although the generous nature of the shape would mean it will probably fit more than that. Mine is a UK 12 with plenty of room. I made my first version in a strange-shaped scrap of a black and white spotted knit fabric that I’ve had lurking in the pile for a while. Because of it’s wonkiness, which wasn’t helped by a printing flaw, it took me a little while and some head-scratching to cut out but I managed it!

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Wrinkly wrists

I made this first one exactly as the pattern with no changes and overall I was very happy with it. The slouchy sizing is about right but, for me, the bicep is a bit too tight.

I bought some lovely aubergine jersey with a hint of sparkle from Escape & Create in St Ives, Cambs when I visited them as part of Alex Sewrendipity’s fabric store guide back in November, I had the Amy specifically in mind for it. This time I increased the depth of the collar by about 8cms, lengthened the body and added to the width of the sleeves to loosen them a little on my chunky arms!

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Gibbon arms!

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slouchy collar

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CB seam and yoke detail

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I’m really happy with this one too and get loads of wear out of it, the fabric washes and tumble dries really well too.

My final version (so far) is made in very fluid black sparkly jersey which I picked up at the autumn Knitting & Stitching show. I had another pattern in mind for it originally but changed my mind. This time I decided to lengthen the pattern a lot to dress length so I think I added about 35-40cms, plus some extra to the collar again.

I don’t think it was a total success because in my head it was fabulous and stylish but seeing myself in it was a whole other matter! I don’t think I got the length right for me, it needs to be worn with high heels to carry it off properly and I just don’t wear them much these days. I tried a belt but that wasn’t flattering. I’ve only worn it once on New Year’s Eve so I think I’ll have to take a bit off the bottom so that it’s nearer knee length. Oh well, some you win, some you lose.

My Amys have certainly been one of my favourite tops this winter because I can layer them up with a long-sleeved T underneath. I think I’ll make a short-sleeved version of Juliene for the summer too. I’ll probably carry on for evermore making adaptations to these styles because they are so wearable and comfortable. There’s an element of me which thinks that Zierstoff doesn’t have the degree of finesse that other PDF patterns have. I might be wrong but I think they are all drafted on a computer rather than by actual pattern cutting so there are the occasional clunky joins or edges but then they are a lot cheaper than most so it’s swings and roundabouts. For the price I think they are perfectly serviceable, and the video tutorials seem pretty thorough. 

As before, I was provided with the patterns but all opinions expressed are entirely my own. If you want to try a Zierstoff pattern for yourself use my 20% off voucher code Susan Young Sewing at the checkout, it’s valid once so you could buy a couple to make it worthwhile.

Happy sewing

Sue

 

French dart shift by Maven Patterns

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This could very well be the perfect dress for the imperfect figure. It sits nicely on the shoulders with smooth set-in sleeves that blouse slightly at the cuff (if you’re going full-length) the French darts give it shape and the slight A-line flare of the skirt skims the body, it has pockets and finally there’s a funnel-neck collar to draw attention up towards the face if that’s your best feature! Oh, and there’s no zip, just pop it over your head!

I bought my pattern from the lovely Mike (son in law of Mrs Maven) who was manning the stand at the autumn Knitting & Stitching show for Mrs Maven who’d had to dash off for a family emergency. He must have done a grand job because I bought a pattern, as did many others while I was there, the samples on display were very enticing.

The French Dart Shift appealed to me because I liked it’s relaxed but stylish aesthetic, there are lots of possibilities. It has 3 sleeve options (plus sleeveless) and you could make it in a whole variety of fabrics from winter-weights like worsted wool or denim, through cotton poplins to softer fabrics like crepe or lace with suitable linings.

The patterns aren’t cheap at £18.50 but they are beautifully produced in a folding wallet, printed on quality paper with a comprehensive instruction booklet. I decided to trace off the pattern onto Swedish tracing paper rather than cut it out-I don’t always do this as I’m not an habitual tracer! I checked my body measurements and then using the measurements chart provided so I went for a UK 14. fullsizeoutput_2154

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This time I transferred the pattern to Swedish tracing paper.

I had a rummage in my stash and found some navy fabric with tiny dots which I bought ages ago in Hitchin market and there was just enough. I didn’t follow the cutting plan as I hadn’t got the suggested quantity but by careful refolding and some single-layer cutting I got everything out.

One detail you need to watch out for is that the seam allowance is just 1cm rather than the more usual 1.5cms. The instructions are comprehensive and thorough although if you struggle with following written instructions this might be a challenge for you. There are illustrations too which are very detailed but they could do with being just a bit larger for those of us who are a bit sight-challenged, I managed but that’s partly because I had an inkling of how it was likely to go together.

The instructions encourage quality details such as taping the neck and pocket edges to prevent stretching (I actually used iron-on tape which fulfils the same job) and reinforcing the joins between the pocket bags and the side seams.

I failed to take any photos during the making, sorry about that, but it all went together as intended. The band on the cuffs is quite narrow and a bit fiddly but it’s worth persevering because the end result looks nice. You could leave the cuff off i suppose and make a channel with elastic through it if you wanted, or you could shorten the sleeve to between wrist and elbow length too.

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the narrow gathered cuff is very feminine

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The collar is cut on the bias which gives it a lovely roll and it stands well on it’s own, there’s no interfacing inside it. If you were making the dress in something more flimsy (like cotton lawn for example) you could mount the collar onto a fine fabric like organza, or a second piece of lawn or voile to give it more body.

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Finished, I actually hand-stitched the hem so that it was nice and invisible.

I finished the navy dress before Christmas-I wore it on Christmas Day in fact, but I’ve only just made a second version recently [a 2 week bout of flu put paid to any creative sewing for a while]

I’ve made this second version in a lovely Ponte Roma I bought from Fabrics Galore at the Knitting & Stitching Show 18 months ago (I don’t like to rush these things) Although Ponte isn’t one of the suggested fabrics it’s worked well but you need to make sure that the wide neck edge is taped to prevent it being stretched before you put the collar on.

I think I can safely say this dress is my ‘secret pyjamas’, it’s sooo comfy!

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Whoop, the sun came out so here’s some pictures in the garden. I used the twin needle to turn up the hem on this one.

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I chose not to cut the collar on the bias because it’s a slightly stretchy fabric and this has back-fired a bit because it’s collapsing. Never mind, we live and learn, I should have followed my own advice and mounted it onto something else for a bit of structure.

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All in all I’m delighted with this dress and I can see me making several more for the summer. Take a look at the Maven website for more inspiration with fabrics, you could even leave the collar off, and I know Portia Lawrie has produced a colour-block version too which looks fab. I think I’ll investigate some of Maven’s other patterns now too as they look really appealing!

Let me know if you’ve tried any of them,

Happy sewing

Sue

a Moneta dress to ‘party’ in!

moneta dress

I haven’t made anything by Colette patterns before but I’ve heard about the Moneta and when I saw friends Elle (@sewpositivity) Abi (@sewabigail) and Rach (@rach_wain) on Instagram had got together and were organising a ‘Moneta party’, with enticing prizes, I thought I’d enter.

It’s a pattern that’s available as a PDF or in paper form and to be honest, even though it was cheaper, I didn’t really want all the cutting and sticking of a PDF this time. Luckily for me my (almost) local fabric and pattern emporium The Creative Sanctuary in Hertford had one in stock. I popped over to collect it-and ended up buying the pink sparkly star sweat-shirting I used for the top I blogged about previously here at the same time!IMG_1003.jpg

I already had 2 metres of a really nice geometric design Ponte from Backstitch near Cambridge which I thought would be perfect for the dress. In theory, as ever, the pattern instructions stated more fabric than I had but that’s rarely stopped me before!

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I used the blue knit for the Moneta, the black and white and the plain black became a Heather by Sew Over It which you can read about here.

I wasn’t keen on the elbow length sleeves because I prefer below the elbow if they’re not long OR short, I wanted full-length as it was going to be a wintery dress. The idea of the ‘party’ was, I thought, to put a new spin on the style but I wanted it to be a dress I’d be comfortable and happy in so I opted to put my favourite roll collar on. I thought that in itself wouldn’t be original enough so I decided I’d put a fake exposed zip on the back too.

I made a quick toile of the bodice before cutting the fabric because even though it’s a stretchy style I didn’t want it too tight. I cut it slightly between two sizes and this was absolutely fine so I went ahead and cut the dress out of my ‘good’ fabric!

Because of the scarcity of my fabric after I’d cut the rest of the dress with long sleeves I ended up having to cut the collar in two parts and making a join in the centre front.IMG_1029.jpg

There was enough fabric to make 2 rectangles, each 14cms x 35cms which would just fit around the neckline.

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The pattern wasn’t going to quite match at the CF but I decided, unusually for me, that it  wasn’t going to matter too much!

I interfaced the two pieces to give them a bit more stability and then joined them to form one long rectangle. Incidentally, I’d raised the back neckline on the bodice because it was lower than I wanted for a winter dress and the collar wouldn’t be long enough to fit either.

Before I sewed the collar on I’d added the zip (taken out of something else previously) which I bound first with bias binding and then sewed directly onto the CB of the dress. It didn’t need to be a functioning zip because the fabric is stretchy and the dress just goes over your head.img_1028

Next I sewed the collar on to the neck edge.

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Rather than trying to get the seam of the collar under the overlocker I added bias binding to neaten the seam instead.

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I flipped the binding down towards the inside of the dress to enclose the edges and sewed it in place. The stitching won’t show on the right side because the collar would roll down and cover it.

Next it’s the skirt. The pattern calls for clear elastic to gather it but a) I hadn’t got any and b) I discovered it was pretty expensive so I used regular stuff! I cut a length to my waist size plus about 4cms to overlap the ends. This gets evenly divided into quarters around the waist of the skirt. [The skirt has been sewn up the side seams, with pockets inserted already] I used the 3-step zigzag stitch on my machine to sew on the elastic, gently stretching it to fit the skirt as I went. That was surprisingly straightforward! It isn’t a massively gathered skirt so there isn’t loads of fullness to deal with. After this the skirt gets attached to the bodice, simples!

The sleeves fitted in beautifully and everything gets hemmed as required. All that remained was to finish off the back of the collar so I dug out two small metal buttons and stitched them down on each corner to give a buttoned down effect.IMG_1109

So that’s it! One Moneta dress. It would be a pretty quick make if I didn’t keep complicating things! I’ll make a nice simple one next time. As it turned out my original take on the dress wasn’t interesting enough because it came a big fat nowhere in the competition but I’ve had LOADS of lovely comments from people about it and it’s really nice and comfy to wear so it’s not about the winning, it’s the taking part…isn’t it?

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I’ve realised that I look like Stretch Armstrong from the back! Aaargh, good job I can’t see my back 😦

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Ta-dah! in ‘the photo corner’ of the room where I teach my classes.

As I said earlier, this a quick-ish make especially if you have an overlocker but that’s by no means essential. Make sure you use a ballpoint or jersey/stretch needle in your machine (jersey is a ‘knit’ and so can ladder like tights if you use a sharp needle) and if you have a stretch stitch setting or can make a very shallow zigzag you should be fine. Jersey doesn’t usually fray either so it isn’t even essential to neaten the edges every time-use your own judgment on this though.

I wore my Moneta to the Knitting & Stitching show last week and I had loads of people comment on it and ask me for the details-I hope sales of the pattern have gone up as a result!!

Happy sewing

Sue

 

a 60’s style cosy funnel-neck top

In the last couple of weeks I’ve noticed a really nice little top called Toaster by Sew House Seven popping up all over Instagram. It looks cosy and very straightforward to make but me being me I thought “I can do that” so I did!

Initially I needed a suitable fabric and when I was on my outing to Goldhawk Road in London last week I spotted the very thing. It’s a felted-wool jersey in a very pretty coral colour, it cost £8.50 per metre and was 150cms wide so I splashed out on 1m50-I know, so reckless!

So next I needed to create a pattern. I rummaged through my somewhat large pattern collection to see what I might be able to hack (rather than starting totally from scratch) and found a raglan-sleeved T-shirt pattern I’d used last year with some lovely Faberwood French jersey img_3693

New Look pattern K6230 was free with Sew magazine last year and, as you can see, I’d made the V neck version. img_0456

This time I opted for version B with the round neck. Because I didn’t want the top to be too close fitting I opted to make the largest size so that it was roomy enough to layer up other things underneath it. I also wanted shorter sleeves with cuffs so that meant a change to the pattern. The neck-band wasn’t going to be right either so I needed to make a completely new collar pattern.

I traced off the sleeve onto spot and cross paper and shortened it and made it a about 3cms wider at the cuff edge. The new cuff is just a continuation of the sleeve plus seam allowance and a notch to make sure they get sewn on the right way around.

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tracing off the original sleeve, my new hem is the curved pencil line.

It’s important to have the cuff edge of the sleeves at a right angle to the sleeve seam so that it’s a nice smooth line around the arm. You can see in the photo how I’ve used the Patternmaster to line this up.

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New sleeve with it’s cuff

To make a new collar I needed to know how long HALF the total neck edge was so I pinned all the pieces together matching the seam allowances and measured carefully along the stitching line.

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Measuring the neck edge to make a new collar.

I cut out and made up the front, back and sleeves. By not sewing up the side seams until later makes it easier to sew on the collar with everything out flat, then joining the underarm seams towards the end.

I needed to toile the first collar pattern to make sure it worked properly so I cut it out in some scraps of jersey and sewed it onto the neckline. I could already see that it had strange points over the shoulder seams.

 

There shouldn’t be the strange pointy bits sticking out, it should be a smooth line. The back wasn’t too bad but I wanted the front to stand away from my neck more so I needed to add some fullness to the top edge of the piece.

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Version 2 was much better, you can see where I’ve added small ‘wedges’ along the top edge of the collar but nothing along the lower seam line. I then cut it in spot and cross to form a single pattern piece so that it doesn’t have to be cut on the fold of the fabric. [on thick fabric this might not be very accurate so single layers are better]

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Second version of the collar, it looks a lot better.

I was reasonably confident that the collar would be OK now so I went ahead and cut it in fabric, along with interfacing. I’d done a quick test of which interfacing I wanted to use so that it had the right amount of stiffness to make the collar stand out as I wanted.

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I went with the firm inter.

Because the collar involves sewing a convex and concave curve to one another it’s best sewn with the fuller edge of the front UNDERNEATH so that the feed dogs deal with the fullness as you sew, that way it makes the two edges end up the same length and a smooth flat finish. The photo here might make more sense.

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The collar is uppermost with the main part underneath, the slight fullness is visible underneath.

Once the top collar was sewn on I attached the under collar to the top seam and then under stitched it to help it roll to the inside more smoothly. I overlocked the lower edge of the under collar (to reduce bulk at the seam) then I stitched it from the top side in the seam line to secure the collar down.

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Stitching ‘in the ditch’ to secure the collar from the right side.

Nearly there! Time to sew up the underarm seams right throughout to the cuffs. The cuffs then turned up to the inside and are stitched ‘in the ditch’ again, like the collar. So that was virtually it until, at the last minute, I decided to add small patch pocket.

Finito!

I tried it on and couldn’t believe how well the collar had turned out!! It stood out from my neck by just the right amount. Although I had been reasonably confident to would be pretty much as I wanted I wasn’t 100% sure that I wouldn’t have to make another modified version. img_0447

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So there you have it…

Obviously this is my take on a cosy winter top but I hope it demonstrates that it can be quite simple to adapt an existing pattern to create something original of your own (although you might decide it’s easier to buy the actual pattern!) I think I’ll be making more of of these and I’m looking forward to getting a lot of wear from this one in the meantime.

Have a go, you might surprise yourself!

Happy sewing

Sue xx