Simple Sew Cocoon Coat update

If you read my blog reviewing the new Simple Sew Cocoon Jacket a couple of months back then you might recall the crazy-big toile I made to start with. I didn’t want the fabric to go to waste and so eventually I went back to it to finish. Because it’s a checked fabric I had cut it carefully to match even though it was only for a toile originally. [Since writing the original blog its been brought to my attention that the instructions for joining the front and back pieces together are currently wrong and show the front piece being attached the wrong way up! I’ve done a little diagram below to show how it should be] I’ve realised I thought I’d misunderstood and put it together intuitively, when actually it was the instructions not me, but this isn’t very helpful to you!

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This is how the diagram looks on the instruction sheet
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This is how it should go together.

 

 

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The original HUGE toile back in the summer.

Basically I deconstructed the whole thing by unpicking the seams so that it was the main pieces of fronts and backs again, I hadn’t put any facings on it so this process was pretty quick. Once I’d got the pieces broken down I placed the reduced size pattern pieces from which I’d made my denim version on top of the checked fabric, still matching the checks carefully, and recut them smaller. This time I cut out the facings and patch pockets too.

Then I simply made it up in exactly the same way as the denim coat, I didn’t use any decorative topstitching this time though.

I decided not to use the giant poppers for this one so I had a rummage in my button collection and found two HUGE buttons of unknown origin. This presented two problems, firstly I had to work out very precisely where the buttonholes should be sewn so that when the buttons are done up the checks on the front still match (because I’m like that!) and then I discovered that, because the button was far too large for the automatic buttonhole foot, there were actually NO instructions in the guide book for my machine on how to make a freehand outsize buttonhole. This caused me so much head-scratching! I goggled it on the interweb with no luck but then I remembered my friend Anne, who is an expert sewer, has the same machine as me so I messaged her. She agreed there were definitely no instructions (I wasn’t going nuts!) and whilst I’d have to work out the specifics for my particular buttonhole, she pointed me in the right direction and eventually I had two acceptable buttonholes. What a palaver!

 

 

Anyway, I finished it in the end and the Cocoon Coat pattern will be officially released in the next week as the free gift with Sew Now magazine and on their website so everyone will get the chance to try this very simple but stylish coat. [I noticed the website does draw your attention to the generous sizing and I strongly recommend you make a toile or tissue fit first] I’ve made both mine in woven fabrics but you could try it in boiled wool or another fabric which doesn’t need to be faced or neatened. What about a double-faced jersey cloth, perhaps with a soft fleecy side? You could add a collar, or turn-back cuffs? So may possibilities for such a simple garment.

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I’ve had lots of wear from the denim coat, it’s been really versatile because it isn’t too heavy but there’s room for layers underneath when it gets a bit cooler. What will you make yours in?

Until next time,

Happy sewing

Sue

Adding a pocket flap to Tilly and the Buttons Cleo dungarees.

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In my previous blog about the Tilly and the Buttons Cleo I told you how my daughter had bought me the aubergine babycord kit for Christmas. I finally got around to making it this week after a bout of flu and a lingering cough slowed me up considerably.

You can read the first blog here, the reason for writing this one is to tell you briefly about putting a flap onto the patch pocket.

First I made a pattern piece for the flap using the actual pocket as a template.

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I simply used the width and lower edge for the point and then it’s a case of deciding how deep you want the finished flap to be and add seam allowance to the top edge. This is about 3.5cms

I cut 2 in babycord but you could could have one in the main fabric and one in a contrast or lining fabric [this is definitely worth doing if your fabric is thick or bulky]

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First apply the interfacing to what will become the top flap and then sew the 2 pieces of fabric together.
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Trim the corners.
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Turn it through and press. Stitch the open top edge together.
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Top stitch around the lower edge if you like too.
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Make the buttonhole at this point if you’re having one, as you can see this one was totally off-centre so I unpicked and did it again!

Sew the patch pocket onto the dress front according to the balance marks and then place the flap above it.

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Pin it this way first, if you’ve used a contrast fabric under the flap this will be uppermost. The stitching line is a little above the pocket, probably about 1.2cms. Sew the flap on.
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Carefully trim away some of the excess, being careful not to cut through the dress underneath! These are my duckbill scissors from Ernest Wright, they’ve been such an excellent buy.
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Fold the flap down and topstitch all the way along the top edge. This method self-neatens the seam underneath. Sew on a button.

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All finished! This time I topstitched around the edges which I didn’t on my teal version. I used the clips which were supplied with the Cleo kit too.

Button and buttonhole on the first version and no topstitching.

I love the shade of purple and I’m thinking about a top to go with it, possibly my next Simple Sew blogger project using some fabric from my stash….watch this space!

I’ve only put a flap on the main front pocket but there’s no reason why you shouldn’t do them on the back pockets too.

I hope you find this easy to follow and it adds a little extra to the dress I think.

Happy sewing

Sue

Zoe dress and top by Simple Sew

I’ve been asked recently to join the Simple Sew Bloggers so every now and again you’ll be getting the benefit of my wisdom (!) on their patterns. This first blog though is about one of their patterns which I’ve had for ages so I’ve done a quick write up on the Zoe dress and top because I’ve already used it a number of times.

Since the Zoe pattern was given away free with the very first issue of Sew Now magazine, which I reviewed here, I’ve used it 3 times. It’s a really wearable basic layering style which I think is similar to those you can find in Fat Face or White Stuff. I’ve made mine in fabrics with a bit of body and I layer long-sleeved T-shirts underneath. The neck has a deep facing which I’ve top stitched in contrast colours usually, the same on the sleeve bands.

 

I made the first using some interesting printed denim I got from Ditto fabrics in Brighton. There are only a few pattern pieces-front/back/neck facings x2/ sleeve band-and no fastenings to worry about so it can be a quick make. I like the front and back centre seams because they give it visual interest and contrast top-stitching helps give it individuality, although if you cut the pieces on the fold you could make it even simpler and quicker.

This first version threw up a couple of issues, namely the dress was much too long for this particular style I felt. Being a straight shift it ended quite a way below my knees (I’m 5’5’ so not especially short) and was unflattering.

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actually it doesn’t look that bad here with my hands on my hips but I wasn’t happy so I chopped about 15cms off the bottom!

The other issue is that the bateau neckline is rather wide and might not suit you if you’ve got narrow shoulders. It isn’t a problem if you’re wearing a top under the dress but if you’ve made the shorter version to wear on it’s own I think your bra straps would be constantly showing on one side or the other. I left it on the first 2 versions I made but when I made the checked one more recently I extended the shoulder seams in towards my neck by about 2cms. This means it’s much snugger although still easily goes over my head.

 

On the denim version I top stitched many of the seams using neon pink thread.

 

This was before I got my new machine which I can use a twin needle on so I laboriously did each line twice. One of the nice details about the dress is the patch pocket positioned over the side seam. My suggestion to make this a bit easier would be to only sew up that side seam and apply the pocket before you sew up the second side-it just gives you a bit more room for manoeuvre. There’s only one pocket-obviously you could have 2-and somehow I managed to sew mine on the left side when I’m right-handed! Oops.

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My Zoe even featured on the ‘readers makes’ page in Sew Now!

For the second version I used a lovely printed needlecord which I got in Goldhawk Rd, London. This time I put the pocket on the right side and I top stitched in both pink and orange. I embellished the neckline with a few brightly coloured buttons from my stash, it’s a fun way of adding some individual touches to something you’ve made.

 

 

It’s looking well worn now as it’s been through the wash quite a bit, although that does mean the fabric is nice and soft now.

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As always, I style it up with a top underneath, winter tights and a selection of necklaces…and silver shoes!

And finally….the most recent version made shortly before Christmas came out of a very modest remnant that was probably 15-20 years old, minimum! This is a dress that you can get out of very little fabric, particularly if it’s wide, because the main pieces are virtually straight, the sleeves are two rectangles and the facings aren’t very wide, or you could cut them in a contrast to save fabric. I had to cut the pocket across the fabric but that’s fine although it did mean that I couldn’t pattern-match it.

Incidentally, I didn’t follow the pocket instruction method they suggested because I think it’s a bit cack-handed, pressing the edges in is a palaver so I bagged it out like this instead, it’s probably quicker too.

Firstly, cut the pocket piece so that the pocket top edge is the fold, not the lower edge as they tell you.IMG_0051 Next sew from the fold down one side, pivot at the corner and then sew a few more centimetres and stop. Backstitch, or secure the end by your usual method. Now, leave a gap of a several centimetres (no more than about 5-6 probably, it needs to fit your hand through it) Start sewing again towards the corner, pivot and continue to the top, backstitch and finish.

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This is a mini pocket just to show you, I don’t use GIANT pins! The fold is at the top.
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Stitched from the top, around the bottom corners with a gap left in the middle.
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Turned through with the gap at the bottom, push the rough edges in.

Now you can trim the seams slightly and turn the whole pocket through so that it’s RS out, push out the corners to form nice squares and press.

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If you’re going to top stitch do this before sewing the pocket on!

You should now have a nice neat pocket shape which you can place over the side seam and sew in position, making sure the fold is at the top. The stitching will automatically close up the hole at the bottom of the pocket piece as you sew. Simple!

 

This is the one where I narrowed the neckline a bit, I top-stitched in a bright blue this time to match the thin blue stripe in the check. I was able to pattern-match the front and back but not the sleeves or pockets with this one.

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I added some chunky metal buttons to the back seam this time too.(can you see that I’ve sewn the buttons slightly differently to each other….

So there we have the Zoe dress, as you can see for such a simple dress it’s very adaptable, and so comfortable to wear, although it may not suit all figure-types admittedly. I haven’t made it as a top funnily enough, I think that’s because I like the dress length better.

I receive no payment for writing this, I’ve even provided all my own fabric, so you can be sure I’ll say what I think!

Happy sewing

Sue